Translucence of Light

The inspiration of St Francis Xavier Cathedral in Geraldton, Western Australia, considered by some as one of the finest cathedrals built in the 20th century[i], can be found in the Arts and Crafts Movement of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Among the principles of the Arts Crafts Movement is engagement of local builders, artists and crafts persons in the construction and decoration of buildings and the use of vernacular materials. Continue reading “Translucence of Light”

L. Peter Kollar: Architect and Revered Educator (1926-2000)

As a refugee from political suppression in his native Hungary, in 1949 a young architect escaped by making his way through the snows of the European winter camouflaged in a white sheet. After a long and arduous journey, he eventually arrived in Australia where he was to become one of the most influential identities in Australian architecture. Continue reading “L. Peter Kollar: Architect and Revered Educator (1926-2000)”

Natasha – a personal reflection

Natasha by G.W.Bot (detail)
Natasha (detail) – click for full view

When first saw this piece in the early 90s, I was also exploring the Catholic faith. The imagery of an icon was immediately recognisable and arresting. The simplicity of rendering in apparent monotone and the animation of the child I found appealing. It represented for me a gentle welcome into a faith community that has since become my spiritual home. It also became a vehicle for a line of enquiry into my place in the Church and that of women in general. Continue reading “Natasha – a personal reflection”

BOOK REVIEW: Richard Vosko, Art and Architecture for Congregational Worship: The Search for a Common Ground

(Collegeville, Liturgical Press, 2019) 236 pages.

Richard Vosko was in Australia in February 2019 as keynote speaker at the National Liturgical Architecture and Art Council’s symposium Where Your Treasure Is, There Will Your Heart Be Also: Catholic Liturgical Heritage.  Those who met him there will be keen to read this development of his input.  Those who did not meet him have the opportunity to make his acquaintance through this book. Continue reading “BOOK REVIEW: Richard Vosko, Art and Architecture for Congregational Worship: The Search for a Common Ground”

Altyerre – Catholicism’s Sacred Dancing Ground

How did the form of Catholicism adopted by the Mparntwe Arrernte people of Alice Springs Australia become what it is today? Catholicism was introduced by the Missionaries of the Sacred Heart (MSC) and the Daughters of Our Lady of the Sacred Heart (OLSH) from 1935, but the image of modern Catholicism practised by Mparntwe Arrernte Catholics varies in significant ways from what they were taught in the mission. Continue reading “Altyerre – Catholicism’s Sacred Dancing Ground”

RESTORATION OF STS PETER AND PAUL, BULIMBA

In 1926 when the church was built, the question Who celebrates the liturgy? might have elicited the response Christ celebrates the liturgy, that is, the priest acting ‘in persona Christi’.  Today, our response would be significantly different.  We would respond Christ celebrates the liturgy, that is, the whole Body of Christ consisting of all the baptised.  The full, conscious and active participation of all the faithful in the liturgical celebration is their right and duty by reason of their baptism (SC 14).

Continue reading “RESTORATION OF STS PETER AND PAUL, BULIMBA”

1930’s RELIGIOUS SCULPTURE OF DAPHNE MAYO

Daphne Mayo

DAPHNE MAYO caused a sensation in 1927 when she sculpted the tympanum of Brisbane’s City Hall. The conservative city fathers were astonished by the sight of this diminutive 32 year old woman wielding a jackhammer in the hot sun high above the streets. The work made her reputation and introduced the most productive decade of her life as a sculptor. Besides the women’s war memorial in Anzac Square and other commissions, she undertook a number of religious works which are an important part of the patrimony of the Australian Church.

Continue reading “1930’s RELIGIOUS SCULPTURE OF DAPHNE MAYO”