RON MUECK: Life and Death

Over the last twenty-five years, Australian artist, Ron Mueck (b. 1958), has become well-known for his hyper-realistic sculptures, generally of the human figure either much larger or smaller than life size. Every hair is painstakingly inserted in an eyebrow or a stubbly beard. Whether it is an enormous boy or pregnant woman, whether it is a miniature image of his dead father laid out naked, the sculptures create a sense of awe, wonder and contemplation in the viewer. Continue reading “RON MUECK: Life and Death”

GAIA, Earth

by Luke Jerram

The mighty sphere of the earth rotates slowly, suspended under the gothic arches of St Paul’s Cathedral in Melbourne.  Seven metres in diameter and internally lit, it has been created to scale by Luke Jerram from detailed NASA imagery of the earth’s surface. (It is 1.8 million times smaller than the real earth.) Continue reading “GAIA, Earth”

TOM BASS: in his own words

The Australian sculptor, Thomas Dwyer Bass am, was born in Lithgow in 1916.  After various jobs during the Depression and army service during WWII, he began his career as a sculptor on graduating from the National Art School in 1948.  Prior to the war, Bass attended Dattilo Rubbo’s art school; it was here he was initiated into the principles of art.  At the National Art School he came under the influence of Lyndon Dadswell whose assistant he became during 1949-1950.  This was followed by a three-year stint of teaching there.  From 1951-1964 he held various executive positions with the Sculptors’ Society, of which he was a founding member. Continue reading “TOM BASS: in his own words”

Philip Cooper Sculptor

The Power of Touch

Born in Melbourne, Philip has studied extensively in Theology and Fine Art.  He holds several Post Graduate degrees culminating in his PhD exhibition in Sculpture and Drawing at Monash University, 2015.  During 30 years of art-making he has been presented in a range of solo and group exhibitions, nationally and internationally.  Philip continues lecturing in Drawing and Sculpture at tertiary Art Schools in Melbourne.  His studio is based in Woodend, Victoria, where he lives with his wife and children. 

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Commissioning A Liturgical Artist

The Cathedral of St Stephen in Brisbane holds the best collection of the work of Australian sculptor, John Elliott (1943-2016).  Nowhere else are there three major works together.  The cathedral has the shrine of Virgin Mary, the altar crucifix and the diocesan shrine of patron St Mary MacKillop.  John Elliott was born in Canterbury, England, studied at the Royal College of Art in London, and migrated to Australia in 1970.  He taught sculpture at the Queensland College of Art. Continue reading “Commissioning A Liturgical Artist”

Pauline Clayton Sculptor (10 July 1944 — 3 October 2012)

Pauline Clayton worked as a sculptor in Melbourne and her works are featured in various institutions, including St Francis’ Church, Lonsdale Street, and schools, including Catholic Ladies College, Eltham. In addition to juggling the responsibilities of marriage, helping to raise three children and teaching, Pauline undertook art classes at the Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology (RMIT) and taught art and sculpture in secondary schools, including Geoghegan College, Broadmeadows and Genazzano fcj College, Kew, VIC. Continue reading “Pauline Clayton Sculptor (10 July 1944 — 3 October 2012)”

Leopoldine Mimovich – Immigrant Artist

In the aftermath of World War II thousands of displaced persons from Europe sought a new home in Australia. They came bringing a diverse array of talents to the arts thus contributing to a new and unique artistic sensibility in this country. In time, a flourishing of art, literature, drama and music emerged. One of these immigrant artists was the young sculptor Leopoldine Mimovich. Continue reading “Leopoldine Mimovich – Immigrant Artist”